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Abstract


INTERNATIONAL DENTAL JOURNAL OF STUDENTS RESEARCH - VOLUME 2 ISSUE 2, Dec-June 2014

Pages: 17-23

MEASUREMENT OF PRIMARY AND SECONDARY STABILITY OF DENTAL IMPLANTS BY RESONANCE FREQUENCY ANALYSIS METHOD IN MANDIBLE

Author: 1Mehran Shokri 2Arash Daraeighadikolaei

Category: CLINICAL REPORT

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Abstract:

Background: Determining the dental implant stability is critical since reflects the healing around fixture . The success of the implantation in either case depends on the sufficient primary and secondary stability. The aim of this work was to measure the stability of dental implants before loading the implants, using a Resonance Frequency Analysis (RFA) by the means of Osstells Mentor device, to determine changes in stability during early healing following implant placement.

Methods: 10 healthy and non-smoker patients over 40 years of age with at least six months of complete or partial edentulous mouth received 1-4 screw-types ITI dental implants by 1-stage procedure in mandible bone density of D2 or D3 as classified by Lekholm and Zarb index (1985). The principle behind RFA is to obtain a numerical value relating to stability. The Osstell RFA recording device measures the resonance in a magnetic field of a 1cm commercially manufactured attachment (SmartPeg) that is screwed onto the bone conduction device abutment. RFA measurements were obtained at surgery, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, and 11 weeks after implant surgery.

Results: Fifteen threaded SLA coated ITI implants evaluated. The lowest mean stability measurement was for four weeks after surgery for all bone types. At placement, the mean ISQ obtained with the magnetic device was 77.2 with 95% confidence interval (CI) =2.49, then it decreased until the 4th weeks to 72.13 (95% CI= 2.88), and at the last measurement the mean implant stability significantly (p-value<0.05) increased and were recorded higher values to 75.6 (95% CI=1.88), at 11th weeks. Changes indicated a pattern of decreased mean stability from the surgery date to 4 weeks post-placement, and significantly increased mean stability from 4 to 11 weeks after surgery and tended to increase with time. Student t test comparison of bone groups at each time point relatively significant differences between implant stability in Types 2 and 3 bone at 4 weeks after surgery (P = .006)

Conclusions: The results of the present study proved the lowest value of implant stability at 4 weeks post-surgery, which was statistically significant, and may be indicative of a period of time when loading might be disadvantageous following implant placement. There were no significant differences in stability changes pattern among two bone types after four weeks of healing; It seems that either immediate or post-early implant placement loading are suitable in terms of sufficient stability. These suggestions need to be further assessed through future studies.

Keywords: dental implants, Implant Stability Quotient, Primary Stability, Resonance Frequency Analysis, Secondary Stability

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